The software was previously known as XBMC, or Xbox Media Centre, since that was the only hardware is was designed to run on.But that has changed over the years, as the media player evolved, thanks to hundreds of coders across the globe tinkering with the software.

Since it first launched back in 2003, Kodi has been shaped by some 500 developers and 200 translators.

And now the open-source media player runs on a whole host of different devices. In fact, some estimates place 20 million devices in use in the UK at the moment.

In a nutshell, it turns any desktop computer, server, smartphone, tablet or set-top box into a media player able to stream files from the internet, your home network or local HDD storage. Unlike the Apple TV, Google ChromeCast or others, the Kodi media player is not restricted by licensing agreements, or a curated app store.

That means Kodi users can download a plethora of community-built apps, that might not be approved under the guidelines that govern the Apple App Store, Google Play Store, and others.

The Kodi software itself is perfectly legal, however, it does allow users to install additional applications that allow them to access copyrighted material – uploaded, shared or streamed from other users across the globe.However the problem with Kodi is that content is illegally taken from content providers like Sky Sports, Sky Cinema, Netflix, BBC Worldwide and others.

Those who use the Kodi platform to access this material would be taking a serious risk.

Obviously accessing the material in this manner is illegal.

One problem viewers who use the Kodi platform face is, unlike the carefully-curated Apple App Store or Google Play Store, it might not always be clear where the content is coming from – or whether it has been legally obtained.